Heritage Bridge

Experience Your Past

Presentations

Laurie is available to speak at your events on the topics below, or can develop a custom presentation. She speaks on various topics on the Midwestern states--for general interest audiences as well as research-oriented presentations. She also speaks on marketing and society strategy. 

 Please contact me and let's discuss what you need.

 

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Finding Relationships: A Decade-by-Decade Guide

Many sources yield information to connect generations. But where to start?  Learn why the time period matters, and which sources work best for each decade.

From Ohio to Missouri: How the States Were Settled

Learn how waterways, canals, and roads had a big impact on Midwest settlement patterns. We’ll also identify the groups that made the trip.

Midwest Research at 30,000 Feet: A “Flyover” of Similarities and Differences Between States

Although record types are similar across the Midwest, efficient access points and repositories can differ significantly. Learn to quickly get the lay of the land. 

Travel Back to 1800s Missouri: What You Can See Today

From river towns to the Santa Fe Trail to Civil War sites, there are many places your Missouri ancestors knew that that you can still visit today.  

Travel Back to 1800s Ohio: What You Can See Today

A lot happened in Ohio! From Native American sites to the National Road to factories, let’s visit what your ancestors saw in the Buckeye State.

Where Did They Go When They Left Ohio?

As the first state in the Northwest Territory, many of our ancestors passed through Ohio as they made their way west. Explore the likely places they went next.

Civil War Reunions: Reflection and Remembrance

Your Civil War ancestor may have attended one of the many post-war reunions – learn about these encampments and how to possibly find a family connection.

“Over Here”: Mobilizing on the Midwest Home Front in World War II

World War II affected your family beyond the men that served. Learn about war efforts in industry, agriculture and daily life.

Road Trip!  Planning a Visit to Your Grandfather’s Home Town

It’s time to leave the screen behind and get on the road—go see the places where your family lived, worked, and worshiped, and also learn new genealogy skills by doing onsite research. In this session, you’ll learn how to do your advance trip planning, then how to make the most of your time in your family’s home town.  

Researching in A New Area: Create a Quick Reference Guide!

Have you just found the county your family moved from, back in 1810?  In this session, you’ll learn tips and tricks for how to get up to speed quickly, and will receive a template for a reusable quick reference guide.  We’ll cover the most important record types you should find, learning techniques that will apply to most geographic areas for finding records online or in person. 

STRATEGIC PLANNING AND MARKETING

Borrowing Corporate Strategy Techniques for Your Society

Many societies are at a crossroads— new competition from online genealogy sites and webinars, dwindling membership, and challenges in figuring out how to evolve activities. Learn how to align your society leadership on your vision for the future, your current mission, how you are positioning yourself against the competition, and identifying and prioritizing your target audiences. 

A Marketing Plan is More than a Business Card and a Facebook Page

When thinking about marketing, many small business owners and genealogy societies make the mistake of jumping straight to tactics, by making decisions to use channels like a business website, blog, or social media.  If you are using certain channels because “everyone is” or “I think I should," then you may benefit from stepping back and developing a clear understanding of why you might choose certain channels and what you want to accomplish.

“Shouldn’t our Society Be on Twitter?!”  Consider This First.  

Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Pinterest. LinkedIn. Blogs. Brochures. Newsletters. The society website.  These are simply “channels” that your society might use to get the word out about your offerings. You’ll learn how to consider your audiences, what you want to say to convince them, how to create “content” that can be reused, and finally—where to distribute that content—and answer the question of whether you should really be on Twitter—or not. 

 

 

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